Our Financial Path.

Live a Better Life with Knowledge and Financial Independence

Category: Saving (page 1 of 3)

Your First Step to Financial Freedom

This is a re-edition of our original post posted on March 20th, 2016.

 

If you are like us and you want to achieve financial independence, you need to know where your money is going and you need to know how you are investing your hard earned dollars. We highly suggest you use the best online tool available today and sign-up for free with Personal Capital.
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When it Will Fall

The next big hit might come tomorrow, next month, next year, no one knows. Anyone who does claim to know is simply playing a probabilities game until he or she gets it right. In other words, it is luck.

Jim Cramer for example, the famous host of Mad Money, shares stock picks every night but these stocks only returned 64.53% over the last 15 years (2001 to 2016) compared to 126.06% for the S&P 500 over the same period.
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BMW is Your Secret to Early Retirement

Everyone has to start somewhere. No one is born a financial genius, nor does everyone have an interest in their personal finances. We all have dreams, goals, bills, and expenses. Personal finance is exactly that; personal.

From a young age, children see their parents swipe those magic plastic cards that let you take anything from stores. They then learn how the bank of mom and dad can pay for the movie nights and new shoes.
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Open Book – Half a Year, Half Way There

This is part of our Open Book series, you can start here if you did not read our first post.

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We are in June and it is time for our mid-year assessment. We have been tracking our income and spending for years and since we discovered the whole concept of financial independence, we started tracking our savings rate. The amazing thing is; the more we can increase our savings rate, the faster we can claim our financial freedom.
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Live with Less

We live a conscious life.

We consciously choose our purchases, our investments, and our lifestyle.

 

When we face a choice, we try to think of alternatives and try to pick the optimal option that will maximize our happiness while minimizing costs. Using the utilitarianism ethical theory, for example, “Happiness” here is defined as the maximization of pleasure and the minimization of pain.
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Will you Survive Retirement?

Over the years, prosperity rose, quality of life improved, and life expectancy increased drastically. Life expectancy in 1900 was only 46.3 years old for men and 48.3 years old for women while just fifty years later in the 1950s, it was up to 65.6 years old for men and 71.1 years old for women. Nowadays, the probability for a baby boomer to live through his or her 80s is almost half.
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How to Choose a Home?

Shopping for a house was a huge consideration for us and it should be one for anyone in the process of moving since it is likely the biggest purchase one will make in his life. Buying too little might not be wise, just like buying too big might not be wise. Depending on your location and plans, renting might be the optimal choice rather than buying and living slightly further from work might be better than living downtown.
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Why Work More?

Whether you want to splurge at that new Tapas bar that just opened down the street or simply invest an extra $100 this week, it is always nice to earn a little extra income without working harder. There is a bunch of tricks to earn a little more without necessarily clocking in more hours at work or grinding away at a side hustle.
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Happy and Saving

When I was a child, my mom always used to tell me to go play outside. I went outside, picked up a stick in the woods, and could play for hours with my friends and our newly found treasure!

Now, as an adult, I notice that having fun has, somehow, become much more expensive. All my friends buy stuff to have fun.
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Dude, Where’s my Returns?

In recent years, bond yields have gone from the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly. In most of Europe and Japan, negative yields have been introduced and bonds are now in an unforeseen territory. There is now over $11.7 TRILLION dollars worth of bonds with negative yields out there and, surprisingly, there is always buyers for them.

To get this straight, you would now need to pay someone to lend them your money.
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